Bruner/Cott Ranked in 2019 ARCHITECT 50

The numbers are in and the 11th annual ARCHITECT 50 rankings have been announced.

Bruner/Cott is excited to share we have again been ranked one of the top 50 architecture firms by ARCHITECT!

Scores were calculated within three categories to create an overall ranking; business, sustainability, and design. Out of this year’s 183 submissions, Bruner/Cott was named #17 overall, ranking #8 in sustainability, #18 in business, and #81 in design. The firm’s composite score was 88.8 out of 100 possible points.

We are thrilled to be recognized as leaders in sustainable design and to be in such great company among the other ranking firms!

Previous Years’ Rankings:

2019

  • Top 50 Overall: #17
  • Business: #18
  • Sustainability: #8
  • Design: #81

2018

  • Top 50 Overall: #36
  • Business: #112
  • Sustainability: #8
  • Design: #71

2017

  • Top 50 Overall: #14
  • Business: #48
  • Sustainability: #20
  • Design: #38

2016

  • Sustainability: #38

2015

  • Top 50 Overall: #46
  • Sustainability: #39

To view the complete list of this year’s ARCHITECT  50, click here.

To learn more about the ARCHITECT methodology for computing this year’s ranking, click here.

To view Bruner/Cott’s firm page on the ARCHITECT 50 rankings, click here.

For a deeper dive into this year’s data, click here.

 

MASS MoCA Turns 20!

Happy 20th Birthday, MASS MoCA!

Bruner/Cott has been working on the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art since its inception. Housed in a vast 17-acre industrial complex built in the late 1800s for the Arnold Print Works company, the museum was completed in three phases, initially opening to international acclaim in 1999 with 125,000 square feet. Today, the museum comprises 280,000 square feet of galleries, performing arts venues, video/multimedia spaces, and commercial rental units.

MASS MoCA has become ingrained in our firm’s history and has served as a model for other adaptive reuse projects. In a recent interview with ArchDaily, Bruner/Cott Principals Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly offer insider perspectives on the genesis of MASS MoCA.

Over the last thirty years, it has become a testing ground for our practice—in developing ways of weaving old and new together in a more dynamic way than it is typically done. Our co-founder, Simeon Bruner, and one of our principals, Henry Moss, began working with MASS MoCA in the 1980s. Their initial ideas evolved and became intrinsic to the next generation in our firm. Often, historical architecture is preserved as is or taken down to start building from scratch. Our goal is to keep the right amount of old and add the new so that the result is appropriate, sensitive, and coherent.

— Jason Forney, AIA, LEED AP, Principal

Read more, here.

 

 

 

USGBCMA & Dr. Joseph Allen Talk Healthy Buildings at BCA

Bruner/Cott recently had the honor of hosting the USGBCMA’s Health and Wellness Roundtable, a venue for architects, designers, construction managers, and sustainability professionals to discuss issues related to healthy buildings.

The event took place in our new studio space and featured a special guest speaker — Dr. Joseph Allen, Director of the Healthy Buildings Program at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Allen’s research reveals how air, temperature, lighting, and noise can impact our overall health. One specific facet of his work, the Cogfx study, has been instrumental in the A/E/C industry.

Topics covered during this roundtable event included Dr. Allen’s three Cogfx studies and their impacts on the healthy building movement, how we can make health an explicit factor in decision-making processes, and ways in which industry and practice can benefit and support academic research to advance the cause of the healthy building movement. The discussion was followed by an engaging Q & A session with Dr. Allen.

Thank you to all who attended the event, as well as the USGBCMA for putting on the event and Dr. Joseph Allen for joining us as our featured guest.

Pictured in group photo, left to right: Dr. Joseph Allen (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), Meredith Elbaum (Executive Director, USGBCMA), Rachelle Ain, AIA, WELL AP (Bruner/Cott), Jennifer Taranto (Structuretone), Heather Henriksen (Managing Director, Harvard Sustainability), and Jason Jewhurst, AIA (Principal, Bruner/Cott).

Smith Campus Center Reviewed in Boston Globe

The opening of the newly-renovated Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center has had the Harvard community buzzing with excitement.

A thoughtful, yet radical, reappraisal of the original architecture of Josep Lluis Sert (1902-1983), the new Smith Center is part of Harvard’s ‘Common Spaces’ program pioneered by Harvard President Emeritus, Drew Faust.

Recently, Robert Campbell of The Boston Globe had a chance to visit the Smith Center and share his thoughts;

“…you never lose touch with the city outdoors as your near neighbor, because you can see it looking back at you through so many glass walls and windows. Pedestrian bridges span the space and lead you to roof terraces. Most amazing are what Harvard calls the “green walls”: vertical gardens that hang on the walls and look like hedges but never touch the ground. You wander freely as if you were in an urban landscape rather than an enclosed interior.”

Read the full Boston Globe review here.

Frost Terrace Affordable Housing Awarded State Funding

On July 25, 2018, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced the recipients of this year’s affordable rental housing awards, which will provide $57 million in direct subsidies for 19 high-impact projects to fund the development, renovation and preservation of much-needed housing opportunities throughout the Commonwealth.

Among this year’s awardees is Frost Terrace (1791 Mass Ave.), a transit-oriented new construction project for families. Bruner/Cott is working on this 40-unit affordable housing project in the Porter Square neighborhood of Cambridge, MA with sponsor, Capstone Communities. All units will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of the area median income (AMI), with four units reserved for households earning less than 30% of AMI.

Additional project funding for Frost Terrace will derive from Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and subsidy funds via the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) and city trust funds through the City of Cambridge.

“Across our Commonwealth, more and more young families are finding they are not able to put down roots, seniors are not able to age in their communities, and hard-working residents are spending more of their paychecks and precious time traveling further to get to their jobs,” said Housing and Community Development Undersecretary, Janelle Chan.  “Today’s awards will enable communities to grow with their residents, and be a part of a state-wide and regional response to the affordable housing crisis.”

Thank you to the Baker-Polito Administration for this award and your continued commitment to creating affordable to low- and middle- income housing across the state of Massachusetts. We are thrilled to be among the 19 deserving recipients who are transforming their communities and providing vital resources for their neighborhoods.

To learn more about the affordable rental housing awards, click here.

 

Next Steps for Living Village at Yale Divinity School

Bruner/Cott completed a comprehensive study for a new regenerative ‘Living Village’ at Yale Divinity School (YDS), in association with McLennan Design and Andropogon. Designed to meet the Living Building Challenge 3.0 at an unprecedented scale, the new residential complex for living and learning would demonstrate environmental leadership at the highest level and serve as a replicable model for other divinity schools, places of worship, and academic institutions worldwide.

In December, Yale Divinity School received a $2 million contribution from supporters George and Carol Bauer to bring the 127,000 sf residential community to fruition. This gift has allowed YDS to re-engage Bruner/Cott and McLennan Design to design and create the detailed plans for a net-positive housing complex intended to educate its students on sustainable living practices. The project aims to transform how every college and university thinks about residential buildings in the future.

“We are deeply grateful to George and Carol for their generosity in supporting the vision of the Living Village… Thanks to the generosity of the Bauers and the talent and commitment of the design team we’ve assembled, YDS is poised to make history.” – Yale Divinity School Dean Greg Sterling

As described in the 2016 study, the complex is being designed to meet the various imperatives of the Living Building Challenge, the world’s most rigorous green-building certification program, created by project partner Jason McLennan of McLennan Design. The Living Village is expected to house 150 students in below-market-rate residential units, ranging from single “monastic” rooms to two-bedroom apartments for families. Additionally, the complex will likely include classroom space, a small chapel, study areas, a fitness center, and other community spaces such as yoga and meditation rooms, small-group kitches, a cafe, and community dining rooms.

Bruner/Cott and McLennan Design will present conceptual designs to the greater YDS community at Convocation and Reunions in October.

“Above all… we expect the Living Village to stand as a resounding expression of our theoretically rooted commitment to conserving the Earth’s resources and creating a more sustainable future.” – YDS Dean Greg Sterling

Having just received Living Building Certification for the R.W. Kern Center at Hampshire College, Bruner/Cott is extremely excited to progress with this landmark project and is honored to be a part of the design team selected by YDS.

Read the complete announcement from Yale Divinity School. 

Waltham Watch Factory Honored by Victorian Society in America

The New England chapter of the Victorian Society in America (VSA/NE) honored the Waltham Watch Factory at their 46th Annual Preservation Awards Ceremony on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. The Watch Factory project was awarded the Building & Landscape Design award.

Completed in three phases, the building and site are now resourcefully reordered for new office, residential and commercial use. 19th century entrances are now large lobbies, one with a permanent exhibit of Watch Factory history. Narrow wings with high ceilings — already flooded with natural light for watchmakers — house modern offices with views of the courtyards and the Charles River. Outside, a series of protected outdoor spaces invite pedestrians to move through the office buildings and a large residential courtyard. A new restaurant and café mark the beginning of a historic walkway through Waltham along the Charles River.

Thank you to the Victorian Society in America/New England chapter for this honor, as well as to our client, Berkeley Investments, and the Landscape Architect on the project, Richard Burck Associates.

The Kern Center Receives Living Building Certification!

We are thrilled to announce that the R.W. Kern Center at Hampshire College in Amherst , MA has finally been certified as a Living Building by the Living Future Institute! We are very proud of this accomplishment.

Completed in 2016, the Kern Center is now the 18th Living Certified project in the world (17th Living Certified building), the 3rd Living Certified building in Massachusetts, and the 5th largest Living Certified project in the world (by gross building area).

 

About the Living Building Challenge:

The Living Building Challenge is a green building certification program and sustainable design framework that visualizes the ideal for the built environment. It encourages teams to think holistically to find solutions that tackle multiple issues at once, for instance, projects must integrate local culture, biophilic elements, and beauty in order to foster community and natural connections.

The program outlines a design framework that promotes the highest standard of sustainability for the built environment. Rather than a checklist of current best practices, the Living Building Challenge includes a series of performance goals that empower teams to find creative design solutions.

To learn more about the Living Building Challenge, visit the International Living Future website.

 

Congratulations to Hampshire College and all members of the Kern Center team, including:

Bruner/Cott Architects
Living Building Challenge Advisor: Bruce Coldham
Construction Manager: Wright Builders
Code Consulting: Cutler Consulting
Cost Estimating: A.M. Fogarty & Associates Inc.
Energy and Systems Consulting: South Mountain Company
LBC Material Vetting: Integrated Eco Strategy
Lighting Design: Lewis Lighting Design, LLC  
Specifications: Kalin Associates
Electrical Engineering: R.W. Sullivan
Fire Protection Engineering: Rybak Engineering
Geotechnical Engineering: O’Reilly, Talbot & Okun Associates
Mechanical, Plumbing, & Controls Engineering: Kohler & Lewis Engineers
Site/Civil Engineering & Permitting: Berkshire Design Group
Structural Engineering: Foley Buhl Roberts & Associates
Landscape Architecture: Richard Burke Associates

Hampshire College Goes 100% Solar

At Bruner/Cott, we know Hampshire College best for being home to the R.W. Kern Center, a project we completed in 2016 that was designed to meet the rigorous requirements of the Living Building Challenge. The building aims to make a lasting impression on all who enter by demonstrating Hampshire’s commitment to a sustainable future, while inspiring the next generation of leaders in environmentally conscious practices. The Kern Center is completely self-sustaining, generating its own energy, capturing its own water, and processing its own waste. Just last year, the building generated 28% more solar electricity than it used.

However, Hampshire’s commitment to going green does not stop at the Kern Center. The entire college is now running completely on solar power generated on its campus as part of its Climate Action Plan and Sustainability initiative. This initiative includes rooftop solar arrays, like the ones on the roof of the R.W. Kern Center, on structures such as the CSA Barn, the president’s house, and the canopy on top of the Chuck and Polly Longsworth Arts Center.

“There’s a major shift in the way the world makes energy,” said Hampshire College President, Jonathan Lash. “Who’s going to design new energy systems and manage that transition? It will be students like ours who were on a campus that went 100-percent solar and who studied these systems and their impacts. This makes a difference to our educational mission. This is the economy of the future.”

Congratulations to all at Hampshire College for this achievement in sustainability!

To learn more, visit the Hampshire College website.