MIT Boathouse wins Cambridge Preservation Award

We are excited to share that the Cambridge Historic Commission has recognized the Richard J. Resch Boathouse at MIT with a 2023 Preservation Award!

Bruner/Cott partnered with boathouse experts Peterson Architects to revive the Richard J. Resch Boathouse at MIT. Situated along Memorial Drive, the building was originally constructed in 1965 and dedicated in 1966 as the Harold W. Pierce Boathouse. At the time, it was considered one of the most modern collegiate crew training and recreational rowing facilities for men, anywhere. Its most distinguishing feature was the inclusion of an indoor rowing tank that allowed MIT athletes to train year-round, despite the conditions of harsh New England winters.

Construction Begins at Huntington Theatre

The Huntington Theatre is undergoing a major transformation along Boston’s “Avenue of the Arts.” On Thursday, March 25th, the Huntington Theatre Company held a virtual press conference to announce the start of an 18-month renovation period that will restore, revitalize, and modernize the historic performance venue. The Huntington’s Managing Director Michael Maso, Theater Manager Kat Herzig, and Board Chairman David Epstein each gave remarks.

Bruner/Cott Partner and Principal Jason Forney, FAIA, presented new renderings of the reimagined theatre, including a video flythrough.

Construction will be completed in two phases. Phase one will consist of theater renovations and upgrades to enhance the audience experience and create state-of-the-art backstage and technical facilities. Phase two will expand into the adjacent new construction project and will offer 14,000-sf of added amenity space, including ticketing, a café, balcony, bar, and event space.

The Huntington Theatre is expected to reopen for the start of its 2022 season.

For more information about the Huntington Theatre renovation and expansion, click here.

 

Preservation Mass Recognizes Two Bruner/Cott Projects

We are thrilled to share that Preservation Massachusetts has recognized two Bruner/Cott projects with 2020 Preservation Awards!

MASS MoCA Building 6 and Harvard Hall at Harvard University are both recipients of the Robert H. Kuehn Preservation Award. This award recognizes projects that meld collaborative partnerships with creative and cutting-edge ideas for the rehabilitation and active reuse of historic buildings.

“2020 Awards Recipients represent the strong foundations and supportive collaborations that bring new life to our historic buildings and landscapes, push boundaries, and create new aspirations for historic preservation in the Commonwealth.”

All winners will be recognized at a live, virtual celebration on October 22nd.

Thank you, Preservation Massachusetts, and congratulations to all 2020 Preservation Award winners!

Shifting Gears

‘Shifting Gears’ by Henry Moss, AIA, LEED AP is a part of ArchitectureBoston’s spring theme — RENEW.

The article focuses on the historic Charles River Speedway complex as it gets set for a reawakening. The complex will be energized by a brewery and taproom (Notch), a full-service restaurant, small-format shops featuring local makers and artisans, food purveyors, social enterprises, and creative office space. The renewed Speedway site is now under construction, with the courtyard retail and taproom scheduled to open in the fall of 2020.

If winter is cold and dark, at least snowdrops and the promise of spring give us hope and hint of new life. The cycles of change—to cities and the natural world—can remind us that places have souls to lose. Emotions may be mixed. There is a quiet richness to the reworking of existing buildings that has crept into the psyche of the design professions as they resurrect past aesthetics, juxtaposed against new imageries and an overturning of previous uses. Those cycles of change reel from catastrophic to delicately nuanced, and architects try to counter one and orchestrate the other.

Read the full article here.

 

Lost and Found

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]The infrastructure that we have is here to stay, even if the enterprise that once occupied its space is obsolete. The architecture of the future must focus on transformation. It must desurface the potential in our existing built environment with a respect for the past and an eye to the future. [/stblockquote]

Lost and Found, written by Jason Forney AIA and Mason Sanders, is featured on ArchitectureBoston. The fall theme, LOST, addresses a range of thematic touchpoints, from considerations of history to memorials of craft.

The piece highlights building and infrastructure across the United States that have the capacity to live beyond the stories of their past. From Montgomery Block in San Francisco, California to MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, every community has a building that tells its story.

Read the full story on ArchitectureBoston.

 

Charles River Speedway Celebrates Groundbreaking

The Charles River Speedway celebrated its official groundbreaking on Thursday, October 24th!

 

Bruner/Cott joined the Architectural Heritage Foundation (AHF), Massachusetts Department of Conservation & Recreation (DCR), DCAMM, and local leaders and members of the community to break ground at the historic Charles River Speedway.

AHF President Sean McDowell, 18th Suffolk District Representative Michael Moran, DCR Interim Commissioner Jim Montgomery, and DCAMM Commissioner Carl Gladstone gave speeches at the ceremony, followed by drinks from Notch Brewing, the Speedway’s anchor tenant.

The Speedway was constructed in 1899 by the Metropolitan Park Commission (MPC) as a headquarters to support the new parkway along the Charles River, a park that turned a stretch of tidal mudflats into an interconnected series of public parks. Since 2005, the facility has been largely abandoned.

Bruner/Cott is working alongside Architectural Heritage Foundation to revitalize and preserve the historic complex. The Speedway will support a diverse tenant mix that will include small retail shops and maker spaces, a restaurant, café, brewery (Notch Brewing), shared offices, and a publicly-accessible community courtyard.

We were thrilled to celebrate this project milestone! Congratulations to all involved!

Cambridge Historical Commission Honors Harvard Smith Campus Center

Congratulations to Harvard University for being selected to receive an award from the Cambridge Historical Commission for the restoration of the Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center!

The Cambridge Preservation Awards Program honors property owners who conserve and protect the city’s architecture.

This award will be presented at a ceremony and reception on May 16th which will showcase the project in a formal presentation.

Thank you, Cambridge Historical Commission and the City of Cambridge!

 

You can learn more about the Smith Campus Center here.

Speedway Awarded CPA Funding From City of Boston

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the City of Boston’s Preservation Committee have recommended 56 new projects to receive funding as part of the Community Preservation Act (CPA), including the new Speedway HQ.

The Community Preservation Act allocates money toward open space, historic preservation, and affordable housing projects throughout the city’s 23 neighborhoods.

The Speedway, located in Brighton, is anticipated to receive $200,000 from this round of CPA funding. This restoration project will transform the historic Charles River Speedway buildings into a lively gathering space for neighborhood, complete with dining facilities, retail space, and an outdoor plaza.

We look forward to continuing to use this revenue to build on our work related to affordable housing, historic preservation, and open space. – Martin J. Walsh, Mayor of Boston.

Read more in the Boston Business Journal.

MASS MoCA is MAAM’s 2019 Buildy Award Recipient

Congratulations to MASS MoCA on being honored for excellence in museum building as this year’s “Buildy” award recipient by the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums (MAAM)!

This national award recognizes the museum as an institution, its director and staff, and the building/design construction team whose completed museum construction projects demonstrate high achievement in the lessons of the Building Museums™ Symposium: careful, creative planning and diligent implementation, leading to institutional sustainability. It is awarded each year to the most outstanding recent museum building project. The purpose of the Buildy Award is to increase awareness within the field, and by the public at large, of the value of museums and the need for their ongoing rehabilitation and expansion to serve future generations.

The criteria for winning a Buildy includes originality of concept, advancement of the museum’s mission, high achievement in planning and process, green design and construction, community benefit and response, transformative impact, and much more. This award recognizes the museum leadership’s exemplary accomplishment through the three-decade process of completing their master plan for the museum.

MASS MoCA Director Joe Thompson will be accepting the award on March 1st at the annual Building Museums™ Symposium in Brooklyn, NY.

Read the full award announcement on the MAAM website.

360° Views of Harvard’s Most Memorable Spaces

Outgoing Harvard President, Drew Faust, took some time to reflect on her favorite spaces on campus. She shared with The Harvard Gazette the places, times, and ways Harvard marked her, including times of joy, laughter, sorrow, and poignancy. From the recently-renovated Lavietes Basketball Pavilion to the Smith Campus Center currently under construction, Bruner/Cott is responsible for many of Faust’s favorite and most memorable spaces during her ten years as president. The following 360° videos will allow you to experience these projects through her eyes.

 

Lavietes Basketball Pavilion

“I remember very soon after I became president, attending a women’s basketball game and celebrating with them my ascension to female power.”

First constructed in 1926, Lavietes Pavilion is the second-oldest active basketball facility in the United States; a major goal of the project is to celebrate the intimacy and historic charm of the building and showcase the history of Harvard Basketball and Harvard Athletics. Bruner/Cott has been a part of the growth of the Lavietes Pavilion since its first renovation in the 1980s when it was the Briggs Athletic Center. Read more.

 

Memorial Hall 

“It’s hard for me to believe that this wonderful building and that wonderful space was left almost to disuse.”

In collaboration with Venturi, Scott Brown, Bruner/Cott restored the historic shell and upgraded the building to contemporary standards. The restored space boasts hammerbeam trusses, stained glass windows, stenciled ceiling details, walnut paneling, new flooring and custom-designed furniture. Bruner/Cott was responsible for the entire 15,000 sf food service operation, including a total kitchen redesign, new serveries, and Loker Student Commons on the lower level. Read more.

 

Knafel Center (Radcliffe Gymnasium)

“Radcliffe alums not only used that balcony as a track, they had to learn how to lower themselves on a rope from the balcony onto the floor because it was believed that it would be important for women to know how to use a rope to get out of a burning building.”

Radcliffe Gymnasium was designed in 1898 by McKim Mead & White as a gym for students at Radcliffe College. The reinterpreted gymnasium is now a lecture and event salon for the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study in Radcliffe Yard. The Gymnasium’s versatile, multi-use spaces are popular with the entire Harvard community. The large second-floor lecture space — used every day for informal gatherings and study — can be easily converted into a formal setting for social events, with full provisions for catering. The upper-level former running track is now a “walking and talking” track for discussions and informal viewing of presentations and lectures. Read more.

 

Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center

“A university-wide space, in which people could bump into each other, share ideas, find spaces in which to have meetings for their organizations and groups, and embody the sort of unity that I felt would strengthen the university.”

The 1960-65 Holyoke Center by Josep Lluis Sert in Harvard Square is undergoing a major transformation to attract and mix the varied constituencies within the university – faculty, undergraduates, staff, graduate students, and engaged visitors. Bruner/Cott is working with the Harvard client team and design architect, Hopkins Architects of London on extensive programming and sensitive transformation of this campus icon. Construction work, including façade restoration, additions, and interiors, began in the spring of 2016 and is slated for completion in 2018. Read more.

 

To read the entire Harvard Gazette article, click here. Congratulations to Drew Faust on a wonderful career at Harvard University!