Smith Campus Center Receives BSA Education Facility Design Citation

The Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center was recognized at the BSA Awards Gala on January 23rd with a citation with Education Facilities Design.

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]This is what adaptive reuse should be. A great but difficult Sert building is transformed by warm, welcoming interior spaces and an inviting ground level that gives way to the street and gracefully receives visitors. The student center is a true hub for this urban university’s extended community and its visitors. – Jury Comments[/stblockquote]

Thank you to the Boston Society of Architects and members of the jury for recognizing this transformative higher education project!

MASS MoCA Wins AIA Interior Architecture Award

MASS MoCA Building 6 is a recipient of the 2020 AIA Interior Architecture Award!

This award, given by the American Institute of Architects, celebrates the most innovative and spectacular interior spaces. We are thrilled that this transformative reuse project was recognized by the jury.

Gathering space at museum prow

 

MASS MoCA’s Building 6 is a new museum made from found buildings where the spectacular interiors of existing mill structures become a three-dimensional underpainting for new, impactful contemporary art galleries. Read more about the project here.

 

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]What an incredible project! Born out of the tradition of the Tate Modern Museum in London, this bare-bones remodel leaves most of the existing finishes in place to consciously evoke the industrial history of the building and emphasizes the reliance of art on industrial sites for their scale and economy. – Jury comment[/stblockquote]

View the official AIA award announcement here.

Harvard Smith Center is Harleston Parker Medal Finalist

We are thrilled to share the Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center is a finalist for the Harleston Parker Medal!

This annual award seeks to recognize “the single most beautiful building or other structure” built in the metropolitan Boston area in the past 10 years. A panel of eight jurors, led by Paul Pettigrew, AIA, narrowed down nominations to six finalists, including the Smith Campus Center at Harvard.

The winner of the 2019 Harleston Parker Medal will be announced at the BSA Design Awards Gala, held on Thursday, January 23, 2020, in the Morris Auditorium at the 1981 Harleston Parker Medal-winning Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Read more about the Smith Campus Center here.

View the other Harleston Parker Medal finalists here.

Lost and Found

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]The infrastructure that we have is here to stay, even if the enterprise that once occupied its space is obsolete. The architecture of the future must focus on transformation. It must desurface the potential in our existing built environment with a respect for the past and an eye to the future. [/stblockquote]

Lost and Found, written by Jason Forney AIA and Mason Sanders, is featured on ArchitectureBoston. The fall theme, LOST, addresses a range of thematic touchpoints, from considerations of history to memorials of craft.

The piece highlights building and infrastructure across the United States that have the capacity to live beyond the stories of their past. From Montgomery Block in San Francisco, California to MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, every community has a building that tells its story.

Read the full story on ArchitectureBoston.

 

Smith Center Cover Feature in RETROFIT

Featured on the cover of RETROFIT‘s September/October issue is the newly-renovated Smith Campus Center at Harvard University.

In “Harvard University Updates a Brutalist Structure Into a Campus Center That Also Supports the Wider Community,” Bruner/Cott Principal Henry Moss, AIA, LEED AP, discusses the recent renovation of the Richard A. Susan F. Smith Campus Center.

“Designed as an administrative building by Josep Lluis Sert, dean of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, in 1958, Holyoke Center, a Brutalist building on Harvard Square, was completed in 1966. The 100-foot-tall concrete structure was a remarkable work of urban design for its time, proposing innovative street-level pedestrian space at its base. But as the seminal building approached its half-century mark, it had become unloved and well-worn during the passing years.

In 2013, seeking to realize its first-ever physical hub for students, faculty, staff, visitors and the Cambridge, Mass., community at large, university representatives decided to repurpose the lower floors of the building as the new Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center. Part of a multi-year effort to create and improve common spaces across Harvard to ensure its physical spaces would foster the intellectual, cultural and social experience, as well as support the wider community, the revived building was envisioned as the new meeting place of ‘town and gown.'”l-worn during the passing years.

Read the full RETROFIT article here.

MASS MoCA Turns 20!

Happy 20th Birthday, MASS MoCA!

Bruner/Cott has been working on the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art since its inception. Housed in a vast 17-acre industrial complex built in the late 1800s for the Arnold Print Works company, the museum was completed in three phases, initially opening to international acclaim in 1999 with 125,000 square feet. Today, the museum comprises 280,000 square feet of galleries, performing arts venues, video/multimedia spaces, and commercial rental units.

MASS MoCA has become ingrained in our firm’s history and has served as a model for other adaptive reuse projects. In a recent interview with ArchDaily, Bruner/Cott Principals Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly offer insider perspectives on the genesis of MASS MoCA.

Over the last thirty years, it has become a testing ground for our practice—in developing ways of weaving old and new together in a more dynamic way than it is typically done. Our co-founder, Simeon Bruner, and one of our principals, Henry Moss, began working with MASS MoCA in the 1980s. Their initial ideas evolved and became intrinsic to the next generation in our firm. Often, historical architecture is preserved as is or taken down to start building from scratch. Our goal is to keep the right amount of old and add the new so that the result is appropriate, sensitive, and coherent.

— Jason Forney, AIA, LEED AP, Principal

Read more, here.

 

 

 

Cambridge Historical Commission Honors Harvard Smith Campus Center

Congratulations to Harvard University for being selected to receive an award from the Cambridge Historical Commission for the restoration of the Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center!

The Cambridge Preservation Awards Program honors property owners who conserve and protect the city’s architecture.

This award will be presented at a ceremony and reception on May 16th which will showcase the project in a formal presentation.

Thank you, Cambridge Historical Commission and the City of Cambridge!

 

You can learn more about the Smith Campus Center here.

Take a 360° Tour of the McIntyre Project

Bruner/Cott is working with developer Redgate-Kane to revitalize the historic McIntyre Federal Building and the heart of Portsmouth, NH.

The project will feature a variety of public space and lifestyle amenities to complement and enhance downtown Portsmouth, including gathering spaces, a market for local food and beverage vendors, retail space, a co-working space, and more.

You can take a 360° tour of the proposed space here.

Click here to visit the project website for more information.

Speedway Awarded CPA Funding From City of Boston

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the City of Boston’s Preservation Committee have recommended 56 new projects to receive funding as part of the Community Preservation Act (CPA), including the new Speedway HQ.

The Community Preservation Act allocates money toward open space, historic preservation, and affordable housing projects throughout the city’s 23 neighborhoods.

The Speedway, located in Brighton, is anticipated to receive $200,000 from this round of CPA funding. This restoration project will transform the historic Charles River Speedway buildings into a lively gathering space for neighborhood, complete with dining facilities, retail space, and an outdoor plaza.

We look forward to continuing to use this revenue to build on our work related to affordable housing, historic preservation, and open space. – Martin J. Walsh, Mayor of Boston.

Read more in the Boston Business Journal.