Two Bruner/Cott Projects Named BD+C Reconstruction Award Winners

Two Bruner/Cott projects have been named Silver Award winners in the 2021 BD+C Reconstruction Awards – The Swift Factory, a community hub and job incubator in North Hartford, CT, and Frost Terrace, a 100% affordable housing development in Cambridge, MA.

The BD+C Reconstruction Awards recognize the best reconstructed, renovated, or remodeled projects, based on overall design, engineering, and construction project quality. The Swift Factory and Frost Terrace are among nine Silver Award winners this year, out of 40 total submissions and 18 winning projects.

Frost Terrace is a unique, transit-oriented, 100% affordable family community. The project transforms a forgotten residential site along a commercial avenue into a high-quality housing development for low- and middle-income families in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and combines three historic structures with new construction in a single composition. Its immediate proximity to public transit, bike lanes, and essential community services provides critically needed housing in an attractive, sustainable development.

The Swift Gold Leaf Factory, which closed in 2005, was once the economic heart of Hartford, Connecticut’s North End neighborhood. The Factory’s historic factory buildings and two homes have been reimagined into a community venue generating opportunities for job creation and training, educating youth, improving resident health, and spurring economic growth in Northeast Hartford, Connecticut, a disinvested community.

You can view all winners of the 2021 BD+C Reconstruction Awards in the November/December issue, here.

Cambridge Historical Commission Honors Two Bruner/Cott Projects

Two Bruner/Cott projects have received Preservation Awards from the Cambridge Historical Commission – Harvard Hall and 120 Brookline Street!

The Cambridge Preservation Awards Program, inaugurated by the Historical Commission in 1997, celebrates outstanding projects and notable individuals who conserve and protect the city’s architecture and history. Awards are given each May for projects completed within the previous calendar year, as May is National Preservation Month. Due to COVID-19, the 2020 awards ceremony was postponed until October and held virtually. Both Harvard Hall and 120 Brookline Street were honored, and 120 Brookline Street won the Popular Vote for the evening.

Harvard Hall is a brick, granite, and brownstone classroom building situated at the edge of Harvard Yard and Harvard Square, designed in the High Georgian style by Governor Francis Bernard and built by Thomas Dawes between 1764-1766. Major preservation accomplishments of the exterior restoration project include reconstituting deteriorated brownstone profiles with new stone, reuse of original brownstone harvested from the building, reconstruction of the cupola’s belfry and execution of a thorough paint analysis and historic paint color selection. The building was returned to the 1870 time period with new stone at the addition and its period paint color reinstated at window trim, cornice trim and cupola cladding. The comprehensive, highly detailed restoration of Harvard Hall’s exterior contributes to Cambridge’s historic character by re-establishing the coherence of its masonry surfaces and profiles and color scheme from 1870 and masonry from 1766 as distinct from earlier and later buildings within Harvard Yard.

The project at 120 Brookline Street is a renovation of a 1920s-era factory building and an adjacent filling station and ice house that was last used as studio space for artists and musicians. The collection of buildings at the site had undergone many ad hoc and incremental transformations over their lifetimes, serving a range of light industrial, manufacturing, retail, and cultural occupancies. The renovation was designed with the goal of uniting the disparate built elements on the site, improving the experience of the building from the surrounding streets and parks, and updating the building to meet current city requirements for fire safety, accessibility, and resilience. The building was landmarked by the Cambridge Historical Commission during the course of the renovation, recognizing the cultural contributions to Cambridge history that were produced there over the decades.

Thank you to Charles Sullivan and the Cambridge Historical Commission for recognizing these transformative preservation projects!

 

808 Memorial Drive Project Receives $87m in Financing from Mass Housing

Congratulations to client Homeowner’s Rehab Inc. on receiving $87.2 million in financing for the renovation of the 808-812 Memorial Drive multifamily housing community in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This financing will enable HRI to extend affordability protections by at least 15 years and to make substantial property renovations.

Situated along the Charles River, the buildings house 300 mixed-income apartment units of varying sizes, approximately 38,000 sf of commercial space, and five levels of parking. The project aims to improve tenant comfort and sense of security, while also strengthening the residential community and identity.

MassHousing provided HRI with a $61.5 million tax-exempt construction loan and permanent loan, $24.9 million in taxable and tax-exempt credit equity bridge financing and a $787,763 interest reduction payment (IRP) loan. The project will also use $8.9 million of income during the construction period for development costs. The transaction also involved $36.9 million in equity financing from an allocation of Low-Income Housing Tax Credit tax credits by the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development. The LIHTC tax credits were syndicated by RBC.¹

Bruner/Cott is performing an occupied renovation of two 1970s-era apartment buildings with construction expected to be completed by 2022.

Read the full article on Multi-Housing News.

47 Bishop Allen Achieves LEED Gold Certification

47 Bishop Allen Drive has achieved LEED Gold certification from the USGBC!

This Bruner/Cott project replaces an under-utilized parking garage in the Central Square neighborhood of Cambridge, MA with a four-story residential wood frame building. The building includes 23 rental apartments, consisting of both family and one-bedroom units.

The development is transit-oriented and includes no onsite parking, encouraging its tenants to utilize alternate means of transportation. It does, however, include ample bicycle storage for tenants. Other sustainable elements include 100% efficient lighting, ENERGY STAR certified appliances, WaterSense labeled products, and individual fresh air ventilation systems in each apartment. The apartments are projected to use 30% less energy than standard new homes.