2 Bruner/Cott Projects Win BE+ Green Building Awards

Both Frost Terrace and 808 Memorial Drive were recognized at the 2022 BE+ Green Building Showcase!

The annual showcase was held at the Harvard Science & Engineering Complex on October 27th and celebrated an impressive array of projects that have slowly but surely transformed the built environment and our relationship to it.

Frost Terrace, a 100% affordable housing development in the heart of Porter Square, Cambridge, received the Equity + Inclusion award. According to the judges, “this project provides opportunities for affordable, intergenerational living in infill environments. The engagement with the community through design, and the community created by the development, are both exemplary.”

A new award category this year, 808 Memorial Drive received the Sustainable Building Renovation award. According to the judges, “the project caught the jury’s eyes for its replicability, every city has brutalist apartment buildings that would benefit from a face lift. Renovating while the mixed income residents occupied the building took careful consideration to avoid disrupting occupants, and the resultant energy and water savings are compelling. This project gives us hope that refreshing existing buildings can breathe new life into our communities.”

The annual awards program and celebration is an important marker of progress towards sustainable and regenerative design, construction, and operation of the built environment. The local green building community came together in full force. It was the largest showcase since the national Greenbuild conference was held in Boston in 2017. Attendees included architects, engineers, contractors, developers, owners, facility managers, building users, lenders, suppliers, and others who play a role in shaping the built environment.

Thank you, BE+ for recognizing our work at this year’s Green Building Showcase! And congratulations to all recognized projects and teams!

Two Bruner/Cott Projects Named BD+C Reconstruction Award Winners

Two Bruner/Cott projects have been named Silver Award winners in the 2021 BD+C Reconstruction Awards – The Swift Factory, a community hub and job incubator in North Hartford, CT, and Frost Terrace, a 100% affordable housing development in Cambridge, MA.

The BD+C Reconstruction Awards recognize the best reconstructed, renovated, or remodeled projects, based on overall design, engineering, and construction project quality. The Swift Factory and Frost Terrace are among nine Silver Award winners this year, out of 40 total submissions and 18 winning projects.

Frost Terrace is a unique, transit-oriented, 100% affordable family community. The project transforms a forgotten residential site along a commercial avenue into a high-quality housing development for low- and middle-income families in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and combines three historic structures with new construction in a single composition. Its immediate proximity to public transit, bike lanes, and essential community services provides critically needed housing in an attractive, sustainable development.

The Swift Gold Leaf Factory, which closed in 2005, was once the economic heart of Hartford, Connecticut’s North End neighborhood. The Factory’s historic factory buildings and two homes have been reimagined into a community venue generating opportunities for job creation and training, educating youth, improving resident health, and spurring economic growth in Northeast Hartford, Connecticut, a disinvested community.

You can view all winners of the 2021 BD+C Reconstruction Awards in the November/December issue, here.

Construction Begins at Huntington Theatre

The Huntington Theatre is undergoing a major transformation along Boston’s “Avenue of the Arts.” On Thursday, March 25th, the Huntington Theatre Company held a virtual press conference to announce the start of an 18-month renovation period that will restore, revitalize, and modernize the historic performance venue. The Huntington’s Managing Director Michael Maso, Theater Manager Kat Herzig, and Board Chairman David Epstein each gave remarks.

Bruner/Cott Partner and Principal Jason Forney, FAIA, presented new renderings of the reimagined theatre, including a video flythrough.

Construction will be completed in two phases. Phase one will consist of theater renovations and upgrades to enhance the audience experience and create state-of-the-art backstage and technical facilities. Phase two will expand into the adjacent new construction project and will offer 14,000-sf of added amenity space, including ticketing, a café, balcony, bar, and event space.

The Huntington Theatre is expected to reopen for the start of its 2022 season.

For more information about the Huntington Theatre renovation and expansion, click here.

 

808 Memorial Drive Project Receives $87m in Financing from Mass Housing

Congratulations to client Homeowner’s Rehab Inc. on receiving $87.2 million in financing for the renovation of the 808-812 Memorial Drive multifamily housing community in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This financing will enable HRI to extend affordability protections by at least 15 years and to make substantial property renovations.

Situated along the Charles River, the buildings house 300 mixed-income apartment units of varying sizes, approximately 38,000 sf of commercial space, and five levels of parking. The project aims to improve tenant comfort and sense of security, while also strengthening the residential community and identity.

MassHousing provided HRI with a $61.5 million tax-exempt construction loan and permanent loan, $24.9 million in taxable and tax-exempt credit equity bridge financing and a $787,763 interest reduction payment (IRP) loan. The project will also use $8.9 million of income during the construction period for development costs. The transaction also involved $36.9 million in equity financing from an allocation of Low-Income Housing Tax Credit tax credits by the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development. The LIHTC tax credits were syndicated by RBC.¹

Bruner/Cott is performing an occupied renovation of two 1970s-era apartment buildings with construction expected to be completed by 2022.

Read the full article on Multi-Housing News.

Vote for the Harleston Parker People’s Choice Award

The Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center is a finalist for the Harleston Parker People’s Choice Award!

Each year, the BSA selects one building to receive the Harleston Parker Medal, recognizing it as “the single most beautiful building or other structure” built in the metropolitan Boston area. All Harleston Parker Medal finalists are also finalists for The People’s Choice Award. The People’s Choice is determined by online voting and encourages voters to think about what they value and think of as “beautiful” in architecture.

Anyone may vote in this poll, open now through January 23, 2020 at 12pm. The winner of both the People’s Choice Award and the Harleston Parker Medal will be announced at the BSA Awards Gala on January 23, 2020.

Cast your vote here!

 

Smith Center Cover Feature in RETROFIT

Featured on the cover of RETROFIT‘s September/October issue is the newly-renovated Smith Campus Center at Harvard University.

In “Harvard University Updates a Brutalist Structure Into a Campus Center That Also Supports the Wider Community,” Bruner/Cott Principal Henry Moss, AIA, LEED AP, discusses the recent renovation of the Richard A. Susan F. Smith Campus Center.

“Designed as an administrative building by Josep Lluis Sert, dean of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, in 1958, Holyoke Center, a Brutalist building on Harvard Square, was completed in 1966. The 100-foot-tall concrete structure was a remarkable work of urban design for its time, proposing innovative street-level pedestrian space at its base. But as the seminal building approached its half-century mark, it had become unloved and well-worn during the passing years.

In 2013, seeking to realize its first-ever physical hub for students, faculty, staff, visitors and the Cambridge, Mass., community at large, university representatives decided to repurpose the lower floors of the building as the new Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center. Part of a multi-year effort to create and improve common spaces across Harvard to ensure its physical spaces would foster the intellectual, cultural and social experience, as well as support the wider community, the revived building was envisioned as the new meeting place of ‘town and gown.'”l-worn during the passing years.

Read the full RETROFIT article here.

Harvard Smith Campus Center is U.S. Building of the Week

The Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center at Harvard University was named the U.S. Building of the Week by world-architects!

Part of an ongoing university “Common Spaces” initiative, the new Smith Campus Center was designed to ensure its physical spaces foster the campus’s intellectual, cultural, and social experience and support the wider community. The project reconfigures the first, second, and tenth floors, reinterpreting the history and logic of Josep Lluis Sert’s architecture in a series of additions to, and removals from, the existing fabric to create a family of new internal spaces interspersed with a captured internal and external landscape.

Sert served as Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Design from 1953 to 1969, during which time he designed the Holyoke Center across the street from Harvard Square and the gates to Harvard Yard. Now the Smith Campus Center, the administrative building was renovated by Hopkins Architects with Bruner/Cott Architects.

Read the full feature here.

 

 

Smith Campus Center Reviewed in Boston Globe

The opening of the newly-renovated Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center has had the Harvard community buzzing with excitement.

A thoughtful, yet radical, reappraisal of the original architecture of Josep Lluis Sert (1902-1983), the new Smith Center is part of Harvard’s ‘Common Spaces’ program pioneered by Harvard President Emeritus, Drew Faust.

Recently, Robert Campbell of The Boston Globe had a chance to visit the Smith Center and share his thoughts;

“…you never lose touch with the city outdoors as your near neighbor, because you can see it looking back at you through so many glass walls and windows. Pedestrian bridges span the space and lead you to roof terraces. Most amazing are what Harvard calls the “green walls”: vertical gardens that hang on the walls and look like hedges but never touch the ground. You wander freely as if you were in an urban landscape rather than an enclosed interior.”

Read the full Boston Globe review here.