2 Bruner/Cott Projects Win Retrofit Metamorphosis Awards

Two Bruner/Cott projects are featured in the November/December issue of Retrofit Magazine as winners of the 2022 Metamorphosis Awards!

 

The Charles River Speedway received 1st Place in the Adaptive Reuse Category. The Speedway is a multi-building reuse project that repositions a 19th-century stable and parks department into a versatile new pubic courtyard, combining historic preservation with forward-thinking sustainable design. The judges commented, “Nice project for the community and nice to see all-electric. The project seems simple, but sometimes achieving simple is a difficult task.”

The Speedway is featured in a five-page spread. Click here to read.

Frost Terrace, a 100% affordable housing community in Cambridge, MA, received 2nd Place in the Multifamily Housing Category. The project weaves together three historic houses, significant contemporary architecture, and a dynamic, human-centered landscape to transform a forgotten residential site along a commercial avenue. The judges commented, “Charming integration of old and new. Great story about affordability and increased density. I particularly enjoy how the historic house holds the sidewalk edge without being overwhelmed by the addition of new construction behind it. Expertly scaled new construction and lovely sitework makes all the buildings – old and new – fit on the narrow site without feeling cramped.”

Read the full Frost Terrace write-up, here.

Congratulations to both project teams and thank you, Retrofit Magazine, for recognizing our work!

Two Bruner/Cott Projects Named BD+C Reconstruction Award Winners

Two Bruner/Cott projects have been named Silver Award winners in the 2021 BD+C Reconstruction Awards – The Swift Factory, a community hub and job incubator in North Hartford, CT, and Frost Terrace, a 100% affordable housing development in Cambridge, MA.

The BD+C Reconstruction Awards recognize the best reconstructed, renovated, or remodeled projects, based on overall design, engineering, and construction project quality. The Swift Factory and Frost Terrace are among nine Silver Award winners this year, out of 40 total submissions and 18 winning projects.

Frost Terrace is a unique, transit-oriented, 100% affordable family community. The project transforms a forgotten residential site along a commercial avenue into a high-quality housing development for low- and middle-income families in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and combines three historic structures with new construction in a single composition. Its immediate proximity to public transit, bike lanes, and essential community services provides critically needed housing in an attractive, sustainable development.

The Swift Gold Leaf Factory, which closed in 2005, was once the economic heart of Hartford, Connecticut’s North End neighborhood. The Factory’s historic factory buildings and two homes have been reimagined into a community venue generating opportunities for job creation and training, educating youth, improving resident health, and spurring economic growth in Northeast Hartford, Connecticut, a disinvested community.

You can view all winners of the 2021 BD+C Reconstruction Awards in the November/December issue, here.

Materiality and the Reimagining of Historic Buildings

Re-use projects demand a nuanced approach to design to create spaces for today without discarding the value of existing building fabric. As the climate crisis escalates, finding creative ways to transform these buildings becomes increasingly critical.

In Materiality and the Reimagining of Historic Buildings, Principal Jason Jewhurst discusses how architects are in a position to make these existing places useful again, for the benefit of their communities and the planet.

Read the full article here.

Smith Campus Center Receives BSA Education Facility Design Citation

The Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center was recognized at the BSA Awards Gala on January 23rd with a citation with Education Facilities Design.

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]This is what adaptive reuse should be. A great but difficult Sert building is transformed by warm, welcoming interior spaces and an inviting ground level that gives way to the street and gracefully receives visitors. The student center is a true hub for this urban university’s extended community and its visitors. – Jury Comments[/stblockquote]

Thank you to the Boston Society of Architects and members of the jury for recognizing this transformative higher education project!

Lost and Found

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]The infrastructure that we have is here to stay, even if the enterprise that once occupied its space is obsolete. The architecture of the future must focus on transformation. It must desurface the potential in our existing built environment with a respect for the past and an eye to the future. [/stblockquote]

Lost and Found, written by Jason Forney AIA and Mason Sanders, is featured on ArchitectureBoston. The fall theme, LOST, addresses a range of thematic touchpoints, from considerations of history to memorials of craft.

The piece highlights building and infrastructure across the United States that have the capacity to live beyond the stories of their past. From Montgomery Block in San Francisco, California to MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, every community has a building that tells its story.

Read the full story on ArchitectureBoston.

 

Swift Factory Redevelopment Bringing Hope to Northern Hartford

The redevelopment of the former M. Swift & Sons gold leafing factory is transforming the former industrial complex into a food business hub that will be geared toward creating jobs and opportunities for neighborhood residents.

On July 25, neighborhood residents had an opportunity to tour the Swift Factory property and envision the potential of the new site. The community is hopeful that the new hub will breathe life back into the economically depressed neighborhood.

““This is like a breath of fresh air,” said Rosa Bailey, former neighborhood resident who now lives in Bloomfield. “This is going to spark something in people who have been dreaming for years about doing something.”

Residents like Brenda Turner, who grew up in the North End and now lives in Windsor, say they can picture the Swift factory standing at the center of a bustling local economy, like it did decades ago.

Read the full article by the Hartford Courant here.

MASS MoCA Turns 20!

Happy 20th Birthday, MASS MoCA!

Bruner/Cott has been working on the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art since its inception. Housed in a vast 17-acre industrial complex built in the late 1800s for the Arnold Print Works company, the museum was completed in three phases, initially opening to international acclaim in 1999 with 125,000 square feet. Today, the museum comprises 280,000 square feet of galleries, performing arts venues, video/multimedia spaces, and commercial rental units.

MASS MoCA has become ingrained in our firm’s history and has served as a model for other adaptive reuse projects. In a recent interview with ArchDaily, Bruner/Cott Principals Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly offer insider perspectives on the genesis of MASS MoCA.

Over the last thirty years, it has become a testing ground for our practice—in developing ways of weaving old and new together in a more dynamic way than it is typically done. Our co-founder, Simeon Bruner, and one of our principals, Henry Moss, began working with MASS MoCA in the 1980s. Their initial ideas evolved and became intrinsic to the next generation in our firm. Often, historical architecture is preserved as is or taken down to start building from scratch. Our goal is to keep the right amount of old and add the new so that the result is appropriate, sensitive, and coherent.

— Jason Forney, AIA, LEED AP, Principal

Read more, here.

 

 

 

Speedway Awarded CPA Funding From City of Boston

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the City of Boston’s Preservation Committee have recommended 56 new projects to receive funding as part of the Community Preservation Act (CPA), including the new Speedway HQ.

The Community Preservation Act allocates money toward open space, historic preservation, and affordable housing projects throughout the city’s 23 neighborhoods.

The Speedway, located in Brighton, is anticipated to receive $200,000 from this round of CPA funding. This restoration project will transform the historic Charles River Speedway buildings into a lively gathering space for neighborhood, complete with dining facilities, retail space, and an outdoor plaza.

We look forward to continuing to use this revenue to build on our work related to affordable housing, historic preservation, and open space. – Martin J. Walsh, Mayor of Boston.

Read more in the Boston Business Journal.

MASS MoCA is MAAM’s 2019 Buildy Award Recipient

Congratulations to MASS MoCA on being honored for excellence in museum building as this year’s “Buildy” award recipient by the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums (MAAM)!

This national award recognizes the museum as an institution, its director and staff, and the building/design construction team whose completed museum construction projects demonstrate high achievement in the lessons of the Building Museums™ Symposium: careful, creative planning and diligent implementation, leading to institutional sustainability. It is awarded each year to the most outstanding recent museum building project. The purpose of the Buildy Award is to increase awareness within the field, and by the public at large, of the value of museums and the need for their ongoing rehabilitation and expansion to serve future generations.

The criteria for winning a Buildy includes originality of concept, advancement of the museum’s mission, high achievement in planning and process, green design and construction, community benefit and response, transformative impact, and much more. This award recognizes the museum leadership’s exemplary accomplishment through the three-decade process of completing their master plan for the museum.

MASS MoCA Director Joe Thompson will be accepting the award on March 1st at the annual Building Museums™ Symposium in Brooklyn, NY.

Read the full award announcement on the MAAM website.

Ground Has Been Broken at Hartford Swift Factory

Ground has officially been broken at the Swift Factory in Hartford, Connecticut!

The vacant factory campus will soon be transformed into an “economic engine” for local job growth, healthy food production and distribution, and local business partnerships, all with zero displacement. It is expected to bring over 150 long-term jobs to the North Hartford Promise Zone, part of an initiative started in 2015 that provides federal resources to spur economic opportunity in communities across the United States.

Bruner/Cott celebrated this milestone with members of Consigli Construction Co. and Community Solutions, as well as US Senator Richard Blumentahl, Representative John B. Larson, Mayor Luke Bronin, and residents of the North Hartford community.

From gold leaves to green leaves, the Swift Factory will house a 35,000 sf indoor farm run by FreshBox Farms, as well as a commercial kitchen and incub

ator for developing local food business. Two historic houses on the property will also be repurposed for community use.

“Today is a historic day for the North End of Hartford. Today’s groundbreaking is a step forward for the revitalization of the Historic Swift Factory. Its new role as a hub for food business, health, and jobs will make a huge impact on this community. I would like to congratulate Mayor Bronin and Community Solutions for all their work on this project,” – US Representative John Larson, CT

To learn more about the Swift Factory redevelopment, visit the project website at www.swiftfactory.org.

 

Photos courtesy of Bruner/Cott Principal Jason Jewhurst, AIA.