Preservation Magazine Features Swift Factory in Summer Issue

Hartford’s newly reimagined Swift Factory is featured in the summer issue of Preservation Magazine, a publication presented by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The article, A Transformed Gilding Factory Gives Hartford Locals a Chance to Shine, details the history of the Swift Factory and its transformational journey to become a community resource once again.

Like the building’s new materials blending with the old, Swift Factory bridges Hartford’s industrial past with its diversified future.

Bruner/Cott led the architectural transformation of the Swift Factory in 2020 in partnership with client and nonprofit developer, Community Solutions. The factory complex, which had sat vacant since 2005, was once the industrial and economic heart of North Hartford, a disinvested community in Connecticut. Following Community Solutions’ acquisition of the complex and a robust community process, the factory was renovated to house commissary kitchens for local restaurants, incubator kitchen space for fledgling local businesses, a community-based private school, a healthcare clinic, and shared office space for local entrepreneurs and start-ups.

The new use of the historic Swift Factory considers the economic, health, social, cultural, and environmental conditions of North Hartford to create a sustainable, yet innovative model for improving the quality of life for the neighborhood’s residents.

Read the full article on Saving Places.

Lost and Found

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]The infrastructure that we have is here to stay, even if the enterprise that once occupied its space is obsolete. The architecture of the future must focus on transformation. It must desurface the potential in our existing built environment with a respect for the past and an eye to the future. [/stblockquote]

Lost and Found, written by Jason Forney AIA and Mason Sanders, is featured on ArchitectureBoston. The fall theme, LOST, addresses a range of thematic touchpoints, from considerations of history to memorials of craft.

The piece highlights building and infrastructure across the United States that have the capacity to live beyond the stories of their past. From Montgomery Block in San Francisco, California to MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, every community has a building that tells its story.

Read the full story on ArchitectureBoston.

 

Feature by Henry Moss in Architecture Boston

Queen to Alice: “It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards.” Fifty years ago, few of us expected that the hearts of American cities would start to beat again. Our down

towns had sustained a continuous decline. There was little protection for the familiar, the recognizably historic, or the texture of active streetscapes — let alone the residents of Boston’s West End. The sense of loss over the demolition of landmark structures such as Pennsylvania Station concentrated emotional reactions to broader changes in our cities and towns. A righteous oppos

ition emerged, reinforced by the unpopularity of replacement buildings and the antiurban spatial economy of our automobile culture. Few people now realize how federal incentives to modernize the appearance of main street retail frontages dramatically affected American towns under the New Deal — or how unopposed those changes were…”

And so begins a feature in the Fall 2017 issue of ArchitectureBoston magazine, written by Bruner/Cott Principal, Henry Moss, AIA. This issue’s feature section was titled, “Second Look,” and included contributors who had written about these topics in years past. Henry originally wrote about preservation in the July/August 2006 “1976” issue of ArchitectureBoston. You can read the full article online or download a PDF version of the fall 2017 feature here.