Preservation Mass Recognizes Two Bruner/Cott Projects

We are thrilled to share that Preservation Massachusetts has recognized two Bruner/Cott projects with 2020 Preservation Awards!

MASS MoCA Building 6 and Harvard Hall at Harvard University are both recipients of the Robert H. Kuehn Preservation Award. This award recognizes projects that meld collaborative partnerships with creative and cutting-edge ideas for the rehabilitation and active reuse of historic buildings.

“2020 Awards Recipients represent the strong foundations and supportive collaborations that bring new life to our historic buildings and landscapes, push boundaries, and create new aspirations for historic preservation in the Commonwealth.”

All winners will be recognized at a live, virtual celebration on October 22nd.

Thank you, Preservation Massachusetts, and congratulations to all 2020 Preservation Award winners!

Smith Campus Center Receives BSA Education Facility Design Citation

The Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center was recognized at the BSA Awards Gala on January 23rd with a citation with Education Facilities Design.

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]This is what adaptive reuse should be. A great but difficult Sert building is transformed by warm, welcoming interior spaces and an inviting ground level that gives way to the street and gracefully receives visitors. The student center is a true hub for this urban university’s extended community and its visitors. – Jury Comments[/stblockquote]

Thank you to the Boston Society of Architects and members of the jury for recognizing this transformative higher education project!

Vote for the Harleston Parker People’s Choice Award

The Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center is a finalist for the Harleston Parker People’s Choice Award!

Each year, the BSA selects one building to receive the Harleston Parker Medal, recognizing it as “the single most beautiful building or other structure” built in the metropolitan Boston area. All Harleston Parker Medal finalists are also finalists for The People’s Choice Award. The People’s Choice is determined by online voting and encourages voters to think about what they value and think of as “beautiful” in architecture.

Anyone may vote in this poll, open now through January 23, 2020 at 12pm. The winner of both the People’s Choice Award and the Harleston Parker Medal will be announced at the BSA Awards Gala on January 23, 2020.

Cast your vote here!

 

Harvard Smith Center is Harleston Parker Medal Finalist

We are thrilled to share the Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center is a finalist for the Harleston Parker Medal!

This annual award seeks to recognize “the single most beautiful building or other structure” built in the metropolitan Boston area in the past 10 years. A panel of eight jurors, led by Paul Pettigrew, AIA, narrowed down nominations to six finalists, including the Smith Campus Center at Harvard.

The winner of the 2019 Harleston Parker Medal will be announced at the BSA Design Awards Gala, held on Thursday, January 23, 2020, in the Morris Auditorium at the 1981 Harleston Parker Medal-winning Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Read more about the Smith Campus Center here.

View the other Harleston Parker Medal finalists here.

Smith Center Cover Feature in RETROFIT

Featured on the cover of RETROFIT‘s September/October issue is the newly-renovated Smith Campus Center at Harvard University.

In “Harvard University Updates a Brutalist Structure Into a Campus Center That Also Supports the Wider Community,” Bruner/Cott Principal Henry Moss, AIA, LEED AP, discusses the recent renovation of the Richard A. Susan F. Smith Campus Center.

“Designed as an administrative building by Josep Lluis Sert, dean of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, in 1958, Holyoke Center, a Brutalist building on Harvard Square, was completed in 1966. The 100-foot-tall concrete structure was a remarkable work of urban design for its time, proposing innovative street-level pedestrian space at its base. But as the seminal building approached its half-century mark, it had become unloved and well-worn during the passing years.

In 2013, seeking to realize its first-ever physical hub for students, faculty, staff, visitors and the Cambridge, Mass., community at large, university representatives decided to repurpose the lower floors of the building as the new Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center. Part of a multi-year effort to create and improve common spaces across Harvard to ensure its physical spaces would foster the intellectual, cultural and social experience, as well as support the wider community, the revived building was envisioned as the new meeting place of ‘town and gown.'”l-worn during the passing years.

Read the full RETROFIT article here.

Harvard Smith Campus Center is U.S. Building of the Week

The Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center at Harvard University was named the U.S. Building of the Week by world-architects!

Part of an ongoing university “Common Spaces” initiative, the new Smith Campus Center was designed to ensure its physical spaces foster the campus’s intellectual, cultural, and social experience and support the wider community. The project reconfigures the first, second, and tenth floors, reinterpreting the history and logic of Josep Lluis Sert’s architecture in a series of additions to, and removals from, the existing fabric to create a family of new internal spaces interspersed with a captured internal and external landscape.

Sert served as Dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Design from 1953 to 1969, during which time he designed the Holyoke Center across the street from Harvard Square and the gates to Harvard Yard. Now the Smith Campus Center, the administrative building was renovated by Hopkins Architects with Bruner/Cott Architects.

Read the full feature here.

 

 

USGBCMA & Dr. Joseph Allen Talk Healthy Buildings at BCA

Bruner/Cott recently had the honor of hosting the USGBCMA’s Health and Wellness Roundtable, a venue for architects, designers, construction managers, and sustainability professionals to discuss issues related to healthy buildings.

The event took place in our new studio space and featured a special guest speaker — Dr. Joseph Allen, Director of the Healthy Buildings Program at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Allen’s research reveals how air, temperature, lighting, and noise can impact our overall health. One specific facet of his work, the Cogfx study, has been instrumental in the A/E/C industry.

Topics covered during this roundtable event included Dr. Allen’s three Cogfx studies and their impacts on the healthy building movement, how we can make health an explicit factor in decision-making processes, and ways in which industry and practice can benefit and support academic research to advance the cause of the healthy building movement. The discussion was followed by an engaging Q & A session with Dr. Allen.

Thank you to all who attended the event, as well as the USGBCMA for putting on the event and Dr. Joseph Allen for joining us as our featured guest.

Pictured in group photo, left to right: Dr. Joseph Allen (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health), Meredith Elbaum (Executive Director, USGBCMA), Rachelle Ain, AIA, WELL AP (Bruner/Cott), Jennifer Taranto (Structuretone), Heather Henriksen (Managing Director, Harvard Sustainability), and Jason Jewhurst, AIA (Principal, Bruner/Cott).

Smith Campus Center Reviewed in Boston Globe

The opening of the newly-renovated Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center has had the Harvard community buzzing with excitement.

A thoughtful, yet radical, reappraisal of the original architecture of Josep Lluis Sert (1902-1983), the new Smith Center is part of Harvard’s ‘Common Spaces’ program pioneered by Harvard President Emeritus, Drew Faust.

Recently, Robert Campbell of The Boston Globe had a chance to visit the Smith Center and share his thoughts;

“…you never lose touch with the city outdoors as your near neighbor, because you can see it looking back at you through so many glass walls and windows. Pedestrian bridges span the space and lead you to roof terraces. Most amazing are what Harvard calls the “green walls”: vertical gardens that hang on the walls and look like hedges but never touch the ground. You wander freely as if you were in an urban landscape rather than an enclosed interior.”

Read the full Boston Globe review here.