Take a 360° Tour of the McIntyre Project

Bruner/Cott is working with developer Redgate-Kane to revitalize the historic McIntyre Federal Building and the heart of Portsmouth, NH.

The project will feature a variety of public space and lifestyle amenities to complement and enhance downtown Portsmouth, including gathering spaces, a market for local food and beverage vendors, retail space, a co-working space, and more.

You can take a 360° tour of the proposed space here.

Click here to visit the project website for more information.

Speedway Awarded CPA Funding From City of Boston

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the City of Boston’s Preservation Committee have recommended 56 new projects to receive funding as part of the Community Preservation Act (CPA), including the new Speedway HQ.

The Community Preservation Act allocates money toward open space, historic preservation, and affordable housing projects throughout the city’s 23 neighborhoods.

The Speedway, located in Brighton, is anticipated to receive $200,000 from this round of CPA funding. This restoration project will transform the historic Charles River Speedway buildings into a lively gathering space for neighborhood, complete with dining facilities, retail space, and an outdoor plaza.

We look forward to continuing to use this revenue to build on our work related to affordable housing, historic preservation, and open space. – Martin J. Walsh, Mayor of Boston.

Read more in the Boston Business Journal.

Smith Campus Center Reviewed in Boston Globe

The opening of the newly-renovated Richard A. & Susan F. Smith Campus Center has had the Harvard community buzzing with excitement.

A thoughtful, yet radical, reappraisal of the original architecture of Josep Lluis Sert (1902-1983), the new Smith Center is part of Harvard’s ‘Common Spaces’ program pioneered by Harvard President Emeritus, Drew Faust.

Recently, Robert Campbell of The Boston Globe had a chance to visit the Smith Center and share his thoughts;

“…you never lose touch with the city outdoors as your near neighbor, because you can see it looking back at you through so many glass walls and windows. Pedestrian bridges span the space and lead you to roof terraces. Most amazing are what Harvard calls the “green walls”: vertical gardens that hang on the walls and look like hedges but never touch the ground. You wander freely as if you were in an urban landscape rather than an enclosed interior.”

Read the full Boston Globe review here.

Ground Has Been Broken at Hartford Swift Factory

Ground has officially been broken at the Swift Factory in Hartford, Connecticut!

The vacant factory campus will soon be transformed into an “economic engine” for local job growth, healthy food production and distribution, and local business partnerships, all with zero displacement. It is expected to bring over 150 long-term jobs to the North Hartford Promise Zone, part of an initiative started in 2015 that provides federal resources to spur economic opportunity in communities across the United States.

Bruner/Cott celebrated this milestone with members of Consigli Construction Co. and Community Solutions, as well as US Senator Richard Blumentahl, Representative John B. Larson, Mayor Luke Bronin, and residents of the North Hartford community.

From gold leaves to green leaves, the Swift Factory will house a 35,000 sf indoor farm run by FreshBox Farms, as well as a commercial kitchen and incub

ator for developing local food business. Two historic houses on the property will also be repurposed for community use.

“Today is a historic day for the North End of Hartford. Today’s groundbreaking is a step forward for the revitalization of the Historic Swift Factory. Its new role as a hub for food business, health, and jobs will make a huge impact on this community. I would like to congratulate Mayor Bronin and Community Solutions for all their work on this project,” – US Representative John Larson, CT

To learn more about the Swift Factory redevelopment, visit the project website at www.swiftfactory.org.

 

Photos courtesy of Bruner/Cott Principal Jason Jewhurst, AIA. 

Frost Terrace Affordable Housing Awarded State Funding

On July 25, 2018, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker announced the recipients of this year’s affordable rental housing awards, which will provide $57 million in direct subsidies for 19 high-impact projects to fund the development, renovation and preservation of much-needed housing opportunities throughout the Commonwealth.

Among this year’s awardees is Frost Terrace (1791 Mass Ave.), a transit-oriented new construction project for families. Bruner/Cott is working on this 40-unit affordable housing project in the Porter Square neighborhood of Cambridge, MA with sponsor, Capstone Communities. All units will be affordable to households earning less than 60% of the area median income (AMI), with four units reserved for households earning less than 30% of AMI.

Additional project funding for Frost Terrace will derive from Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and subsidy funds via the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) and city trust funds through the City of Cambridge.

“Across our Commonwealth, more and more young families are finding they are not able to put down roots, seniors are not able to age in their communities, and hard-working residents are spending more of their paychecks and precious time traveling further to get to their jobs,” said Housing and Community Development Undersecretary, Janelle Chan.  “Today’s awards will enable communities to grow with their residents, and be a part of a state-wide and regional response to the affordable housing crisis.”

Thank you to the Baker-Polito Administration for this award and your continued commitment to creating affordable to low- and middle- income housing across the state of Massachusetts. We are thrilled to be among the 19 deserving recipients who are transforming their communities and providing vital resources for their neighborhoods.

To learn more about the affordable rental housing awards, click here.

 

360° Views of Harvard’s Most Memorable Spaces

Outgoing Harvard President, Drew Faust, took some time to reflect on her favorite spaces on campus. She shared with The Harvard Gazette the places, times, and ways Harvard marked her, including times of joy, laughter, sorrow, and poignancy. From the recently-renovated Lavietes Basketball Pavilion to the Smith Campus Center currently under construction, Bruner/Cott is responsible for many of Faust’s favorite and most memorable spaces during her ten years as president. The following 360° videos will allow you to experience these projects through her eyes.

 

Lavietes Basketball Pavilion

“I remember very soon after I became president, attending a women’s basketball game and celebrating with them my ascension to female power.”

First constructed in 1926, Lavietes Pavilion is the second-oldest active basketball facility in the United States; a major goal of the project is to celebrate the intimacy and historic charm of the building and showcase the history of Harvard Basketball and Harvard Athletics. Bruner/Cott has been a part of the growth of the Lavietes Pavilion since its first renovation in the 1980s when it was the Briggs Athletic Center. Read more.

 

Memorial Hall 

“It’s hard for me to believe that this wonderful building and that wonderful space was left almost to disuse.”

In collaboration with Venturi, Scott Brown, Bruner/Cott restored the historic shell and upgraded the building to contemporary standards. The restored space boasts hammerbeam trusses, stained glass windows, stenciled ceiling details, walnut paneling, new flooring and custom-designed furniture. Bruner/Cott was responsible for the entire 15,000 sf food service operation, including a total kitchen redesign, new serveries, and Loker Student Commons on the lower level. Read more.

 

Knafel Center (Radcliffe Gymnasium)

“Radcliffe alums not only used that balcony as a track, they had to learn how to lower themselves on a rope from the balcony onto the floor because it was believed that it would be important for women to know how to use a rope to get out of a burning building.”

Radcliffe Gymnasium was designed in 1898 by McKim Mead & White as a gym for students at Radcliffe College. The reinterpreted gymnasium is now a lecture and event salon for the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study in Radcliffe Yard. The Gymnasium’s versatile, multi-use spaces are popular with the entire Harvard community. The large second-floor lecture space — used every day for informal gatherings and study — can be easily converted into a formal setting for social events, with full provisions for catering. The upper-level former running track is now a “walking and talking” track for discussions and informal viewing of presentations and lectures. Read more.

 

Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center

“A university-wide space, in which people could bump into each other, share ideas, find spaces in which to have meetings for their organizations and groups, and embody the sort of unity that I felt would strengthen the university.”

The 1960-65 Holyoke Center by Josep Lluis Sert in Harvard Square is undergoing a major transformation to attract and mix the varied constituencies within the university – faculty, undergraduates, staff, graduate students, and engaged visitors. Bruner/Cott is working with the Harvard client team and design architect, Hopkins Architects of London on extensive programming and sensitive transformation of this campus icon. Construction work, including façade restoration, additions, and interiors, began in the spring of 2016 and is slated for completion in 2018. Read more.

 

To read the entire Harvard Gazette article, click here. Congratulations to Drew Faust on a wonderful career at Harvard University!

Waltham Watch Factory Honored by Victorian Society in America

The New England chapter of the Victorian Society in America (VSA/NE) honored the Waltham Watch Factory at their 46th Annual Preservation Awards Ceremony on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. The Watch Factory project was awarded the Building & Landscape Design award.

Completed in three phases, the building and site are now resourcefully reordered for new office, residential and commercial use. 19th century entrances are now large lobbies, one with a permanent exhibit of Watch Factory history. Narrow wings with high ceilings — already flooded with natural light for watchmakers — house modern offices with views of the courtyards and the Charles River. Outside, a series of protected outdoor spaces invite pedestrians to move through the office buildings and a large residential courtyard. A new restaurant and café mark the beginning of a historic walkway through Waltham along the Charles River.

Thank you to the Victorian Society in America/New England chapter for this honor, as well as to our client, Berkeley Investments, and the Landscape Architect on the project, Richard Burck Associates.

Macalester’s Institute of Global Citizenship Renamed for Notable Alumnus

The institute for Global Citizenship at Macalester College (St. Paul, MN), is being renamed the Kofi Annan Institute for Global Citizenship following a unanimous vote by the Macalester College Board of Trustees. Annan is the Founding Chair of the Kofi Annan Foundation, the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations, winner of the 2001 Nobel Peace Prize, and member of the Macalester class of 1961. This rededication honors Annan’s global leadership and dedication to peace.

The Kofi Annan Institute for Global Citizenship is housed in Markim Hall, a 16,675-sf facility completed by Bruner/Cott in 2009. Markim Hall was one of the first campus buildings in the United States to earn LEED Platinum Certification, the highest level certification for energy efficiency and environmental design awarded by the USGBC. The building’s design and construction align with the institute’s mission and reflects the college’s deep commitment to sustainable practices and responsible citizenship.

 

The Kern Center Receives Living Building Certification!

We are thrilled to announce that the R.W. Kern Center at Hampshire College in Amherst , MA has finally been certified as a Living Building by the Living Future Institute! We are very proud of this accomplishment.

Completed in 2016, the Kern Center is now the 18th Living Certified project in the world (17th Living Certified building), the 3rd Living Certified building in Massachusetts, and the 5th largest Living Certified project in the world (by gross building area).

 

About the Living Building Challenge:

The Living Building Challenge is a green building certification program and sustainable design framework that visualizes the ideal for the built environment. It encourages teams to think holistically to find solutions that tackle multiple issues at once, for instance, projects must integrate local culture, biophilic elements, and beauty in order to foster community and natural connections.

The program outlines a design framework that promotes the highest standard of sustainability for the built environment. Rather than a checklist of current best practices, the Living Building Challenge includes a series of performance goals that empower teams to find creative design solutions.

To learn more about the Living Building Challenge, visit the International Living Future website.

 

Congratulations to Hampshire College and all members of the Kern Center team, including:

Bruner/Cott Architects
Living Building Challenge Advisor: Bruce Coldham
Construction Manager: Wright Builders
Code Consulting: Cutler Consulting
Cost Estimating: A.M. Fogarty & Associates Inc.
Energy and Systems Consulting: South Mountain Company
LBC Material Vetting: Integrated Eco Strategy
Lighting Design: Lewis Lighting Design, LLC  
Specifications: Kalin Associates
Electrical Engineering: R.W. Sullivan
Fire Protection Engineering: Rybak Engineering
Geotechnical Engineering: O’Reilly, Talbot & Okun Associates
Mechanical, Plumbing, & Controls Engineering: Kohler & Lewis Engineers
Site/Civil Engineering & Permitting: Berkshire Design Group
Structural Engineering: Foley Buhl Roberts & Associates
Landscape Architecture: Richard Burke Associates

Hampshire College Goes 100% Solar

At Bruner/Cott, we know Hampshire College best for being home to the R.W. Kern Center, a project we completed in 2016 that was designed to meet the rigorous requirements of the Living Building Challenge. The building aims to make a lasting impression on all who enter by demonstrating Hampshire’s commitment to a sustainable future, while inspiring the next generation of leaders in environmentally conscious practices. The Kern Center is completely self-sustaining, generating its own energy, capturing its own water, and processing its own waste. Just last year, the building generated 28% more solar electricity than it used.

However, Hampshire’s commitment to going green does not stop at the Kern Center. The entire college is now running completely on solar power generated on its campus as part of its Climate Action Plan and Sustainability initiative. This initiative includes rooftop solar arrays, like the ones on the roof of the R.W. Kern Center, on structures such as the CSA Barn, the president’s house, and the canopy on top of the Chuck and Polly Longsworth Arts Center.

“There’s a major shift in the way the world makes energy,” said Hampshire College President, Jonathan Lash. “Who’s going to design new energy systems and manage that transition? It will be students like ours who were on a campus that went 100-percent solar and who studied these systems and their impacts. This makes a difference to our educational mission. This is the economy of the future.”

Congratulations to all at Hampshire College for this achievement in sustainability!

To learn more, visit the Hampshire College website.