MASS MoCA Wins AIA Interior Architecture Award

MASS MoCA Building 6 is a recipient of the 2020 AIA Interior Architecture Award!

This award, given by the American Institute of Architects, celebrates the most innovative and spectacular interior spaces. We are thrilled that this transformative reuse project was recognized by the jury.

Gathering space at museum prow

 

MASS MoCA’s Building 6 is a new museum made from found buildings where the spectacular interiors of existing mill structures become a three-dimensional underpainting for new, impactful contemporary art galleries. Read more about the project here.

 

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]What an incredible project! Born out of the tradition of the Tate Modern Museum in London, this bare-bones remodel leaves most of the existing finishes in place to consciously evoke the industrial history of the building and emphasizes the reliance of art on industrial sites for their scale and economy. – Jury comment[/stblockquote]

View the official AIA award announcement here.

MASS MoCA Turns 20!

Happy 20th Birthday, MASS MoCA!

Bruner/Cott has been working on the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art since its inception. Housed in a vast 17-acre industrial complex built in the late 1800s for the Arnold Print Works company, the museum was completed in three phases, initially opening to international acclaim in 1999 with 125,000 square feet. Today, the museum comprises 280,000 square feet of galleries, performing arts venues, video/multimedia spaces, and commercial rental units.

MASS MoCA has become ingrained in our firm’s history and has served as a model for other adaptive reuse projects. In a recent interview with ArchDaily, Bruner/Cott Principals Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly offer insider perspectives on the genesis of MASS MoCA.

Over the last thirty years, it has become a testing ground for our practice—in developing ways of weaving old and new together in a more dynamic way than it is typically done. Our co-founder, Simeon Bruner, and one of our principals, Henry Moss, began working with MASS MoCA in the 1980s. Their initial ideas evolved and became intrinsic to the next generation in our firm. Often, historical architecture is preserved as is or taken down to start building from scratch. Our goal is to keep the right amount of old and add the new so that the result is appropriate, sensitive, and coherent.

— Jason Forney, AIA, LEED AP, Principal

Read more, here.

 

 

 

MASS MoCA is MAAM’s 2019 Buildy Award Recipient

Congratulations to MASS MoCA on being honored for excellence in museum building as this year’s “Buildy” award recipient by the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums (MAAM)!

This national award recognizes the museum as an institution, its director and staff, and the building/design construction team whose completed museum construction projects demonstrate high achievement in the lessons of the Building Museums™ Symposium: careful, creative planning and diligent implementation, leading to institutional sustainability. It is awarded each year to the most outstanding recent museum building project. The purpose of the Buildy Award is to increase awareness within the field, and by the public at large, of the value of museums and the need for their ongoing rehabilitation and expansion to serve future generations.

The criteria for winning a Buildy includes originality of concept, advancement of the museum’s mission, high achievement in planning and process, green design and construction, community benefit and response, transformative impact, and much more. This award recognizes the museum leadership’s exemplary accomplishment through the three-decade process of completing their master plan for the museum.

MASS MoCA Director Joe Thompson will be accepting the award on March 1st at the annual Building Museums™ Symposium in Brooklyn, NY.

Read the full award announcement on the MAAM website.

Waltham Watch Factory Honored by Victorian Society in America

The New England chapter of the Victorian Society in America (VSA/NE) honored the Waltham Watch Factory at their 46th Annual Preservation Awards Ceremony on Tuesday, June 26, 2018. The Watch Factory project was awarded the Building & Landscape Design award.

Completed in three phases, the building and site are now resourcefully reordered for new office, residential and commercial use. 19th century entrances are now large lobbies, one with a permanent exhibit of Watch Factory history. Narrow wings with high ceilings — already flooded with natural light for watchmakers — house modern offices with views of the courtyards and the Charles River. Outside, a series of protected outdoor spaces invite pedestrians to move through the office buildings and a large residential courtyard. A new restaurant and café mark the beginning of a historic walkway through Waltham along the Charles River.

Thank you to the Victorian Society in America/New England chapter for this honor, as well as to our client, Berkeley Investments, and the Landscape Architect on the project, Richard Burck Associates.

Lessons Learned from MASS MoCA

Set in more than twenty historic industrial buildings on sixteen acres, the vast art complex known as MASS MoCA – the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art – stands as one of the largest public galleries in the world devoted to the display of contemporary art. MASS MoCA unveiled Phase III of it’s 25-year renovation to the public this past May, and critics from across the country have taken notice of it’s unique and extraordinary grandeur.

Rick Brettell and Mark Lamster, art and architecture critics of The Dallas Morning News, recently paid a visit to the newly-expanded facility, admiring the “gritty allure” that makes MASS MoCA such a spectacular sight.

On it’s sheer size and scale, Lamster commented, “it is such a pleasure to be “lost” in a museum, to have a sense of discovery… [and] MASS MoCA’s architecture is ideal in that is can accommodate so many different scales.” While Brettell added, “among the many pleasure of MASS MoCA is the sense of aimlessness its very enormity gives to any viewer.”

You can read their full article here, which further discusses how contemporary art institutions in Dallas can follow MASS MoCA’s lead and repurpose some of the city’s existing historic buildings into hubs for art, culture, and innovation.