Preservation Magazine Features Swift Factory in Summer Issue

Hartford’s newly reimagined Swift Factory is featured in the summer issue of Preservation Magazine, a publication presented by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The article, A Transformed Gilding Factory Gives Hartford Locals a Chance to Shine, details the history of the Swift Factory and its transformational journey to become a community resource once again.

Like the building’s new materials blending with the old, Swift Factory bridges Hartford’s industrial past with its diversified future.

Bruner/Cott led the architectural transformation of the Swift Factory in 2020 in partnership with client and nonprofit developer, Community Solutions. The factory complex, which had sat vacant since 2005, was once the industrial and economic heart of North Hartford, a disinvested community in Connecticut. Following Community Solutions’ acquisition of the complex and a robust community process, the factory was renovated to house commissary kitchens for local restaurants, incubator kitchen space for fledgling local businesses, a community-based private school, a healthcare clinic, and shared office space for local entrepreneurs and start-ups.

The new use of the historic Swift Factory considers the economic, health, social, cultural, and environmental conditions of North Hartford to create a sustainable, yet innovative model for improving the quality of life for the neighborhood’s residents.

Read the full article on Saving Places.

808 Memorial Drive Project Receives $87m in Financing from Mass Housing

Congratulations to client Homeowner’s Rehab Inc. on receiving $87.2 million in financing for the renovation of the 808-812 Memorial Drive multifamily housing community in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This financing will enable HRI to extend affordability protections by at least 15 years and to make substantial property renovations.

Situated along the Charles River, the buildings house 300 mixed-income apartment units of varying sizes, approximately 38,000 sf of commercial space, and five levels of parking. The project aims to improve tenant comfort and sense of security, while also strengthening the residential community and identity.

MassHousing provided HRI with a $61.5 million tax-exempt construction loan and permanent loan, $24.9 million in taxable and tax-exempt credit equity bridge financing and a $787,763 interest reduction payment (IRP) loan. The project will also use $8.9 million of income during the construction period for development costs. The transaction also involved $36.9 million in equity financing from an allocation of Low-Income Housing Tax Credit tax credits by the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development. The LIHTC tax credits were syndicated by RBC.¹

Bruner/Cott is performing an occupied renovation of two 1970s-era apartment buildings with construction expected to be completed by 2022.

Read the full article on Multi-Housing News.

MASS MoCA Building 6 In June Issue of ARCHITECT Magazine

Recipient of a 2020 AIA Interior Architecture Award MASS MoCA’s Building 6 is featured in the June 2020 issue of ARCHITECT magazine.

“Deep in the heart of New England’s Berkshire Hills, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) showcases some of the boldest and most challenging work of our time in a setting far removed from the typical exhibition environment. Its home since 1999 has been the Arnold Print Works complex, a defunct factory in the town of North Adams. Boston-based Bruner/Cott & Associates has driven the adaptive reuse of the 20-building industrial campus into a world-class arts facility in several phases over the last 20 years. But the recent transformation of Building 6 encapsulates the intrepid spirit of the whole institution in a single, sprawling interior.”

Read the full article here.

Materiality and the Reimagining of Historic Buildings

Re-use projects demand a nuanced approach to design to create spaces for today without discarding the value of existing building fabric. As the climate crisis escalates, finding creative ways to transform these buildings becomes increasingly critical.

In Materiality and the Reimagining of Historic Buildings, Principal Jason Jewhurst discusses how architects are in a position to make these existing places useful again, for the benefit of their communities and the planet.

Read the full article here.

Shifting Gears

‘Shifting Gears’ by Henry Moss, AIA, LEED AP is a part of ArchitectureBoston’s spring theme — RENEW.

The article focuses on the historic Charles River Speedway complex as it gets set for a reawakening. The complex will be energized by a brewery and taproom (Notch), a full-service restaurant, small-format shops featuring local makers and artisans, food purveyors, social enterprises, and creative office space. The renewed Speedway site is now under construction, with the courtyard retail and taproom scheduled to open in the fall of 2020.

If winter is cold and dark, at least snowdrops and the promise of spring give us hope and hint of new life. The cycles of change—to cities and the natural world—can remind us that places have souls to lose. Emotions may be mixed. There is a quiet richness to the reworking of existing buildings that has crept into the psyche of the design professions as they resurrect past aesthetics, juxtaposed against new imageries and an overturning of previous uses. Those cycles of change reel from catastrophic to delicately nuanced, and architects try to counter one and orchestrate the other.

Read the full article here.

 

Lost and Found

[stblockquote title=”” top_left=”” author=””]The infrastructure that we have is here to stay, even if the enterprise that once occupied its space is obsolete. The architecture of the future must focus on transformation. It must desurface the potential in our existing built environment with a respect for the past and an eye to the future. [/stblockquote]

Lost and Found, written by Jason Forney AIA and Mason Sanders, is featured on ArchitectureBoston. The fall theme, LOST, addresses a range of thematic touchpoints, from considerations of history to memorials of craft.

The piece highlights building and infrastructure across the United States that have the capacity to live beyond the stories of their past. From Montgomery Block in San Francisco, California to MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, every community has a building that tells its story.

Read the full story on ArchitectureBoston.

 

Smith Center Cover Feature in RETROFIT

Featured on the cover of RETROFIT‘s September/October issue is the newly-renovated Smith Campus Center at Harvard University.

In “Harvard University Updates a Brutalist Structure Into a Campus Center That Also Supports the Wider Community,” Bruner/Cott Principal Henry Moss, AIA, LEED AP, discusses the recent renovation of the Richard A. Susan F. Smith Campus Center.

“Designed as an administrative building by Josep Lluis Sert, dean of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, in 1958, Holyoke Center, a Brutalist building on Harvard Square, was completed in 1966. The 100-foot-tall concrete structure was a remarkable work of urban design for its time, proposing innovative street-level pedestrian space at its base. But as the seminal building approached its half-century mark, it had become unloved and well-worn during the passing years.

In 2013, seeking to realize its first-ever physical hub for students, faculty, staff, visitors and the Cambridge, Mass., community at large, university representatives decided to repurpose the lower floors of the building as the new Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Campus Center. Part of a multi-year effort to create and improve common spaces across Harvard to ensure its physical spaces would foster the intellectual, cultural and social experience, as well as support the wider community, the revived building was envisioned as the new meeting place of ‘town and gown.'”l-worn during the passing years.

Read the full RETROFIT article here.

Swift Factory Redevelopment Bringing Hope to Northern Hartford

The redevelopment of the former M. Swift & Sons gold leafing factory is transforming the former industrial complex into a food business hub that will be geared toward creating jobs and opportunities for neighborhood residents.

On July 25, neighborhood residents had an opportunity to tour the Swift Factory property and envision the potential of the new site. The community is hopeful that the new hub will breathe life back into the economically depressed neighborhood.

““This is like a breath of fresh air,” said Rosa Bailey, former neighborhood resident who now lives in Bloomfield. “This is going to spark something in people who have been dreaming for years about doing something.”

Residents like Brenda Turner, who grew up in the North End and now lives in Windsor, say they can picture the Swift factory standing at the center of a bustling local economy, like it did decades ago.

Read the full article by the Hartford Courant here.

Living Building Makers: Creating Sustainable Buildings That Renew Our World

Living Building Makers: Creating Sustainable Buildings That Renew Our World is a handcrafted collection of stories celebrating the people who bring the built environment to life.

The book was written by Jonathan A. Wright, an accomplished maker specializing in the construction and design of sustainable, healthy, high-performance buildings. Wright Builders, Inc. has constructed two Living Buildings in Amherst, MA – the R.W. Kern Center and the Hitchcock Center for the Environment.

Set on the Hampshire College campus, Jonathan A. Wright’s stories are a tribute to the unsung individuals – builders, tradespeople, designers, engineers, educators, craftspeople, and owners – who rolled up their sleeves to play a part in creating two of the greenest buildings in the world.

Living Building Makers: Creating Sustainable Buildings That Renew Our World is available through the Ecotone Publishing Bookstore, here.

ArchDaily Interview with Bruner/Cott

Bruner/Cott Principals Jason Forney, Jason Jewhurst, and Dana Kelly sat down with Vladimir Belogolovsky of ArchDaily to discuss the firm’s innovative history of work, inspirations, and the direction of the practice.

For us, every project is about moving forward. Any building project can be viewed as reuse because they all have a site and context that will be transformed by what’s to come. We strive to design buildings constructed out of solid, local, beautiful materials and push the current building industry standards to produce a robust sustainable architecture that will age gracefully over time.   — Jason Jewhurst, AIA

Read the full interview here.